The Shape of Things to Come

Planet Earth is a devastated wasteland, and what’s left of humanity has colonized the Moon in domed cities. Humanity’s continued survival depends on an anti-radiation drug only available on planet Delta Three, which has been taken over by Omus, a brilliant but mad mechanic who places no value on human life. Omus wants to come to the Moon to rule and intends to attack it by ramming robot-controlled spaceships into the domes. Dr. John Caball, his son Jason, Jason’s friend, Kim, and a robot named Sparks embark on Caball’s space battlecruiser on an unauthorized mission to Delta Three to stop Omus.

What’s most striking about this hilariously awful film is that someone actually thought that it was worth putting up money to make it. Two years after Star Wars and Close Encounters, someone actually felt that terrible dialogue and direction foisted upon decent actors like Jack Palance and Barry Morse, special effects out of a high school film class, a cheesily overwrought synthesizer score, and clunky 50’s toy-robot villains would make for a worthwhile movie.

I recently saw it with the benefit of fast forward (as another commenter said, the only way to watch this film) and have to wonder if it’s really a parody. Everything about it is so stereotypically and perfectly awful, one wonders if the director was pulling a stunt like Princeton physicist Alan Sokal’s hoax “postmodern physics” article in a doofy po-mo “science” journal.

But Carol Lynley looks great, as does the Canadian National Exhibition complex in Toronto lit from behind.