Bury Me an Angel (1972)

You can complain all you want about low budget production values, but BURY ME AN ANGEL is a lot better than most biker pictures of the age, telling a “revenge-on-the-go” story that satisfies. Best of all, it defines both revenge and attitude at the same time! This is as solid as it gets with writing a feminist statement into an exploitation movie that doesn’t require a single damsel going under a lot of painful distress. Many drive-in movies have copied off this tiring idea numerous times before (like the women-in-prison idea), so this movie was obviously going into a new direction. The key word is revenge, and it defines exactly what this movie is about, not withstanding the pressure of most filmmakers who still haven’t learned how to make good exploitation.

This damsel, by the way, falls under the name of Dixie Peabody, certainly knowing how to show who’s boss throughout the whole film. Her style of character stands out extremely high and sticks with it. You can tell that she has that mean, emotionless personality inside, and never gives up trying. And you know what she’s going after. Revenge, and nothing short of sweet! It’s not bad to have two accompanying buddies to join her for the ride. It would almost be certain that it rips off EASY RIDER, but thank goodness this one isn’t exactly an action film carrying the “femme fatale” label. Who needs it, anyhow?

Bottom line: this IS serious biker hash that doesn’t need to go over the border with lousy creativity demonstrated in SATAN’S SADISTS. You wouldn’t want to miss Dan “Grizzly Addams” Haggerty in a movie like this, a guy reasonable in a dark-haired beard that Nu-Hart later hired. As obscure as BURY ME AN ANGEL has become, so does the actress Dixie Peabody who should have been best remembered for her solid performance on both motorcycle and turf. Where is she today? An overlooked (and perhaps lost) drive-in experience could someday rediscover itself again