Wild Women (1951)

Let’s start off by admitting that the reason this picture was made was to titillate the audience with fantasies of white American males dominated by women. It wants to take the boy rape scene from Ed Wood’s The Violent Years and stretch it out to a feature length film. That is its primary goal. This is not entirely a bad thing but it seems they forgot a few of the subtle details associated with making a movie, like having a writer, a story and a script. The director, Norman Dawn, introduces his ideas early on in the movie and then just lets them lay there without developing a single one. For instance, there is a scene in which the American game hunters spot one of the Ulama women walking hand-in-hand with a guy in a gorilla suit. Hmmmm. What’s this about, you’re likely to ask yourself. Don’t bother because Mr. Dawn isn’t about to elaborate on the relationship between the girl and the ape. He just knows that the film has to exceed an hour in length in order to qualify as a feature motion picture and so he just throws whatever footage is available onto the screen, almost at random in some cases. Stock scenes from some godforsaken film archive comprise the bulk of the movie. Most of them have an African setting, although Mr. Dawn is not opposed to throwing in shots of animals not indigenous to the continent. There is one brief and hilarious clip where a moose is shown.

The scenes featuring the actors all have an improvisational feel to them. The dialogue is all slapdash and does little to move the film forward. At one point the little Italian guy gets carried off by one of the wild women and you think that maybe Norman is about to take the bold step of actually having something happen in his movie, but nothing doing. That bit fizzles out like the rest of the flick.

Summing up, the movie does not even come close to achieving its goal. You will not be titillated by the proceedings in the slightest. most likely you will just be bored. This movie is for lovers of incompetent film-making only!

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